News Scan for Nov 14, 2018

first_imgMeasles clusters grow to 103 cases in New York, New JerseyThe total in three measles clusters—two in New York and one in New Jersey—has grown to 103 cases, according to updates yesterday.The largest is an outbreak in New York’s Rockland County that has now sickened 68 people. The outbreak has been under way since the end of September and was triggered by an international traveler who arrived in the area with a suspected infection. In an update yesterday, Rockland County officials said additional measles cases in infected international travelers have exposed even more people.Rockland County is located in the New York City suburbs, and the cases are clustered in eastern Ramapo, but, because of the country’s small size, officials say exposure could occur anywhere. In response to the outbreak, the county and medical clinics have administered 6,100 doses of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine.Meanwhile, a measles outbreak centered in the Brooklyn, N.Y., Orthodox Jewish community has grown to 24 confirmed cases, according to NYC Health. The outbreak began in October, with the initial case linked to an unvaccinated child who was exposed to measles on a visit to Israel, where a large outbreak is ongoing.Elsewhere, a measles cluster in Ocean County, N.J., has now sickened 11 people, according to an update from the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDH). The county announced the first case on Oct 26, involving an individual who contracted measles during international travel.Nov 13 Rockland County update Nov 13 NYC Health update Nov 13 NJDH update Study examines transfer of bacteria between hospital surfaces, patientsIn a study today in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, researchers from Duke University and the University of North Carolina observed the transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) between the hospital environment and patients in nearly 20% of encounters.In the prospective cohort study, which was conducted at two hospitals, the researchers sought to characterize the nature of bacterial transfer events between patients and environmental surfaces using four “marker” MDROs known for their propensity to contaminate and persist on hospital surfaces: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), Clostridioides difficile, and multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Although contaminated surfaces are thought to play a role in spreading healthcare-associated infections, the nature, direction, persistence, and quantity of bacterial transfer between surfaces and patients remains poorly understood.The researchers collected data on 80 patient-room encounters in 68 general ward rooms. Environmental and patient microbiological samples were obtained on admission into a freshly disinfected inpatient room, and repeat samples from room surfaces and patients were taken on days 3 and 7 and each week the patient stayed in the same room. The two primary outcomes of interest were the baseline and subsequent patterns of patient colonization and hospital surface contamination, and the number of microbiologic and molecularly proven bacterial transfer events between hospital surfaces and patients.In total, 9 patients (11.3%) were asymptomatically colonized with MDROs at study entry. Hospital rooms were contaminated with MDROs despite terminal disinfection in 44 of 80 patient rooms (55%) at the time of study enrollment. The researchers detected microbiologic bacterial transfer events in 12 of 65 patients (18.5%), with 4 occurring from the patient to the environment, 4 occurring from the environment to the patient, and 4 of indeterminate direction. In 2 of the encounters, the patient acquired the MDRO present in the environment at the time of admission.The study authors conclude, “This study suggests that research on prevention methods beyond the standard practice of room disinfection at the end of a patient’s stay is needed to better prevent acquisition of MDROs through the environment.” Nov 14 Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol abstractlast_img read more

Boese Brothers Brewery Opening In Los Alamos

first_imgSam Boese, co-owner and brewmaster of Boese Brothers Brewery in front of the new establishment Tuesday at 145 Central Park Square. Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.comUpdate: Boese Brothers Brewery reported this morning that due to unexpected delays, the brewery is now anticipating an August opening rather than July.By BONNIE J. GORDONLos Alamos Daily Postbjgordon@ladailypost.comWho hasn’t sat around with a friend or family member and a couple of beers, talking about opening your own brewery, club or bar?Well the Boese brothers didn’t just talk. Flash forward about 10 years and Boese Brothers Brewery is coming to Los Alamos. The Boese brothers, Sam and George, also have a Northeast Heights taproom in addition to their downtown brewery in Albuquerque, which they founded in 2014. They partner with New Mexico Hard Cider in Desert Dogs, a Santa Fe pub near the plaza.Boese is pronounced with a long o as in bow and a long e on the end as in zebra.“Occasionally, someone gets it right on the first try,” Sam said.Once you get the name down, Boese Brothers Brewery is pretty catchy.The new bar at 145 Central Park Square is undergoing renovations in the space formerly occupied by UnQuarked Wine Bar. A new marble bar has been installed and new tables, sporting the letter B had just been delivered Tuesday when the Los Alamos Daily Post spoke with Sam at the brewery.“We’re hoping for an early July opening,” Boese said. “We’re waiting on approval from the state, so I can’t say exactly when. The renovations are really coming along.”The new venue will serve the Boese Brothers beer, as well as cider from the New Mexico Hard Cider’s brewery. The Los Alamos location also will serve New Mexico wines, Boese said.“We’ll feature all of our beers on tap,” he said. “We brew between eight and 12 beers at a time, including seasonal beers. For summer, we’re brewing a watermelon sour beer and we have a grapefruit IPA coming.”The new brew pub also will serve food.“We have a great sandwich menu,” Boese said. “We serve hot and cold sandwiches as well as paninis. We’ll have favorites like Ruebens and lots of really great vegetarian choices. We make our own sauces and I promise you, these are great sandwiches.”The plan is to open in the early afternoon and close around 11 p.m., but Boese is leaving the door open to serving lunch and staying open later. The venue also will offer live music.“We’re hoping people will go barhopping and take in the various places in town,” he said.Imagine that, barhopping in Los Alamos.Boese is a graduate of the American Brewers Guild School and worked in several breweries before the brothers started their business, including one in China!He’s also a brand new resident of Los Alamos. Sam and his wife moved to town two months ago. He’s really enjoying his new hometown so far, he said.Hiring is underway at Boese Brothers Los Alamos location. They’re conducting interviews now, so interested people should get in touch soon.Email the brothers at boesebrosbrewpub@gmail.com to set up an interview. To get a peak at the beer menu and learn more about Boese Brothers Brewery, visit boesebrothersbrewery.com.last_img read more

Gay Like Me

first_imgOn Saturday, February 15, award-winning TV, film, and Broadway producer Richie Jackson discussed his new book “Gay Like Me” with “CNN Tonight” anchor Don Lemon at BookHampton in East Hampton. Jackson told his personal life story in the LGBTQ community and its history over the past 50 years. Sharelast_img

Messer Hungarogáz – one of the country’s leading producers of industrial gases.

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

PSA Inspects Detail Engineering of Johan Sverdrup RP Jacket

first_imgPetroleum Safety Authority Norway (PSA) has carried out an audit of Statoil’s follow-up of the detail engineering of the Riser Platform (RP) jacket for Johan Sverdrup.Phase 1 of Statoil’s development of the Johan Sverdrup consists of four jackets. The RP jacket weighs approx. 27,000 tonnes, and is the largest jacket designed by Kværner.The Johan Sverdrup RP jacket is scheduled for delivery in the summer of 2017 from Kværner Verdal.PSA performed an audit during the final phase of engineering at Kværner, and fabrication at Verdal has now started.No non-conformities were detected during this audit, PSA informed.Four improvement points were identified in connection with:Monitoring of analyses;Learning and continuous improvement;Competence;Non-conformity handling.PSA has given Statoil a deadline of January 04, 2016 to report on how the improvement points will be dealt with.last_img read more

Civil procedure

first_imgDiscrimination – Equality and Human Rights Commission – Lay assessors S Deman v Commission for Equality and Human Rights and others: CA (Civ Div) (Lords Justices Sedley, Moses): 6 November 2010 The appellant (X) appealed against a decision that a judge was not required to sit with lay assessors to determine an application by the respondent commission to strike out X’s claim for racial discrimination and victimisation and a decision to strike out X’s claim. X was of Indian ethnic origin. He had applied to the commission for it to support the 17 cases he wished to bring against academic institutions which had not appointed him to posts for which he had applied. While X acknowledged that the commission had provided him with legal assistance and representation to an extent, he commenced proceedings against it, alleging that it had repeatedly failed to support his litigation and had treated him differently and worse than it had treated or would have treated a person of another ethnicity. The commission applied to strike out X’s claim against it. The judge heard the submissions and discharged the attending two lay assessors. In doing so he considered section 67(4) of the Race Relations Act 1976 and found that it did not apply as the proceedings were under the CPR rather than the act. He heard the strike-out application on his own and granted it. X submitted that (1) where one party clearly did not consent to the judge dispensing with the assessors, the court was obliged to sit with the assessors and, if it did not do so, it was unlawfully constituted; (2) there were factors which were or were capable of being material from which a tribunal could conclude that, on the balance of probabilities, the commission had committed an unlawful act of discrimination and the refusal of more assistance and representation was the product of institutional racism in the form of bias against Indian applicants. Held: (1) The application might have been made by virtue of the CPR but the entirety of X’s claim lay under the act. Section 67(4) was not the language of constitutive jurisdiction, laying down when a court was and was not duly constituted. It was more nearly the language of adjudicative jurisdiction, spelling out how a court was to act in determining certain issues. Therefore, where lay assessors were capable of assisting, namely where they could contribute ‘special knowledge and experience of problems connected with relations between persons of different racial groups’, the judge was required to sit with them. Where they could not make such a contribution he was not required to sit with them (see paragraph 12 of judgment).(2) The factors which X relied upon were mostly failures of the commission to provide information or to respond to letters or requests. The demands were part of a barrage of intemperate correspondence to which no organisation, especially one which was publicly funded, could be expected to divert its resources. Further, the claim of institutional racism was based on bare assertion and the judge was fully entitled to decide that the time had come, after X had had many opportunities to put a coherent case together, to call a halt to it. Therefore, the striking out of X’s claim involved no error of law, Anyanwu v South Bank Students Union [2001] UKHL 14, [2001] 1 WLR 638 considered (paragraphs 23, 26-27). Appeal dismissed. John Hendy QC, Ghazan Mahmood (instructed by Bevans) for the appellant; Robin Allen QC, Daniel Dyal (instructed by in-house solicitor) for the respondents.last_img read more

Here’s to the ‘have-a-go’ city

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

BCIS predicts bright future for civil engineering

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

Capital growth

first_imgInfrastructure is now on the political agenda. The government has announced the creation of a TransNorth rail system and an investment programme it is calling the Northern Powerhouse. The Mayor of London is pushing ahead in seeking support for London’s 2050 Infrastructure Plan, while central government is giving him new powers over development. And there is a growing recognition that helping London grow is good for the nation as a whole.After all, London provides £34 billion in tax more than it consumes – funding better public services across the country – and growth in London also tends to create jobs and generate higher investment outside the capital. In fact, 65% of the Gross Value Added (GVA) and job creation stemming from Central London office development accrues to the rest of the UK – with only 35% to London.So the renewed focus on infrastructure is a good start, but sign-off from Whitehall on the Mayor’s infrastructure plan could still be a long way away. In recent decades, London has catapulted itself as a global city, acting as a magnet for people to work, live and play. Businesses love its talent and diversity, and its population is set to hit 10 million by 2030. Yet as a new London First report makes clear, the whole country’s future growth could be reduced unless the capital has the infrastructure investment it needs.In the period following the Second World War, we made a conscious choice not to grow London and instead planned for its decline – an approach that was to the detriment of the UK as a wholeIn the period following the Second World War, we made a conscious choice not to grow London and instead planned for its decline – an approach that was to the detriment of the UK as a whole. I don’t think we should make that mistake again.If the Mayor’s plan were implemented, it could raise London’s annual growth rate from 2.5 per cent to 3.5. New figures crunched by KPMG for London First show investing properly in infrastructure could deliver a £1.9 trillion prize over the next half-century, and significant tax receipts. But if we are to capture those benefits, what do we need to do?Well, first of all, central government could consider giving London greater powers over its finances. The GLA’s borrowing ceilings could be removed (while retaining prudential borrowing rules) and control over property taxes could be devolved to London. Greater fiscal autonomy would make investment in the capital more politically palatable as those benefitting would also be seen as those paying for it.Secondly, the Mayor and the GLA needs to translate its infrastructure plan into a prioritised and integrated homes and infrastructure investment programme, created in concert with central government, businesses and other stakeholders, focused on driving higher economic growth.Thirdly, the business community must recognise its own part in funding the infrastructure that’s needed, plus hold infrastructure providers to account as a quid pro quo for the funding provided.Without these steps, London risks stagnating as a global centre for business. That would be a wholly unnecessary loss as historic low interest rates mean we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to invest in infrastructure. Are we going to plan for a greater London or, by dodging the opportunity, once more effectively plan for decline?Chris Grigg is chief executive of British Landlast_img read more

Mammoet Germany expands

first_imgJens Krawczynski, managing director of Mammoet Germany, said: “The new Leipzig crane location, which is in line with our expansion strategy, will offer mobile crane rental services throughout the Leipzig – Halle – Leuna region.”René Xyländer, head of cranes and transport at Mammoet Germany, added: “From Leipzig, we are able to mobilise our crane and transport technology to the surrounding locations within the shortest amount of time. For our customers, this means better and above all faster availability of our heavy-lifting technology on their construction sites.”www.mammoet.comlast_img