The full fury of Anonymous felt by security company HBGary

first_imgAnonymous are renowned for their DDoS attacks on several companies who opposed the whistle-blowing site WikiLeaks, yet so far these attacks have been minor compared to their latest exploit.It appears that the Internet vigilante group was not happy with the security firm HBGary. More specifically, with CEO Aaron Barr whom had been working closely with the FBI to uncover details of  their senior Anonymous members (aka Owen and a member called Q), and were prepared to release their findings at a security conference in San Francisco.Anonymous felt that the findings of HBGary were a load of nonsense, especially after they successfully retrieved the documents HBGary had collected by hacking into the companies main server via a back door exploit (an insecure Web server).We’ve seen your internal documents, all of them, and do you know what we did? We laughed. Most of the information you’ve ‘extracted’ is publicly available via our IRC networks. The personal details of Anonymous members you think you’ve acquired are, quite simply nonsense. So why can’t you sell this information to the FBI like you intended? Because we’re going to give it to them for free. Anonymous believe that HBGary is simply using the above intel as an elaborate PR stunt to ensure that they made millions, so they decided to teach Barr a lesson.They started off by collecting 60,000 personal emails which they then published to BitTorrent. After that they hijacked Barr’s personal Twitter and Linkedin accounts, placed scolding messages on the boards, and continued to publish his social security number and home address.HBGary co-founder Greg Hoglund confirmed last Sunday that the attacks were a lot more sophisticated than Anonymous’ previous DDoS attacks and would cost the company millions of dollars due to the exposure of proprietary information.Hoglund commented:Before this, what these guys were doing was technically illegal, but it was in direct support of a government whistle blower. But now, we have a situation where they’re committing a federal crime, stealing private data and posting it on a torrent. It appears that Anonymous are not too worried about what Hoglund or the company thinks, especially as they left this closing comment:It would appear that security experts are not expertly secured Read more at ars technica and the Anonymous Statement“We’ve seen your internal documents, all of them, and do you know what we did? We laughed. Most of the information you’ve ‘extracted’ is publicly available via our IRC networks,” Anonymous wrote in a statement posted to HBGary’s site on Sunday. “So why can’t you sell this information to the FBI like you intended? Because we’re going to give it to them for free.”last_img

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