Rafters top Woodchucks in wild win

first_imgFor the City TimesWISCONSIN RAPIDS – The Wisconsin Rapids Rafters (2-0) had to come back twice in a 14-7 win over the Wisconsin Woodchucks (0-2) before the game was called in the ninth inning due to rain.The Rafters struck first with an RBI groundout by Roman Trujillo in the third inning. The Woodchucks put up a three-spot one inning later to take the lead. Wisconsin extended its lead in the seventh with a two-RBI double.In the bottom of the seventh inning, Trujillo, Josh Nicoloff and Jake Dunham had RBIs in a four-run frame to tie the game. The Woodchucks retook the lead in the eighth on an RBI single and held a 7-5 advantage heading to the bottom of the eighth.Trujillo pulled the Rafters within one with a single in the eighth and Nicoloff gave Rapids the lead with a two-RBI double. Peter Matt doubled later in the inning to add to the Rafters lead and Edarian Williams hit a three-run homer to left field to put an exclamation point on a nine-run inning that put the Rafters up 14-7.Rain forced the game to be delayed and ultimately called in the ninth inning, giving the Rafters the 14-7 victory. Wisconsin Rapids improves to 2-0 in the second half and extends its winning streak to eight.Wisconsin Rapids starting pitcher Zack Hunsicker struck out three batters in four innings of work and Cal Djuraskovic pitched three innings in relief. Brayden Bonner took over for Brady Stover and closed out the eighth inning to earn the win for the Rafters. Lenny Gwizalda gets the loss in relief for Wisconsin.The Rafters begin a five-game road trip that starts in Fond du Lac on Friday.last_img read more

South African exile art comes home

first_img18 February 2009South Africans in exile are the focus of a four-month retrospective at the Johannesburg Art Gallery – “probably one of the major highlights of the year” for the gallery, according to the head curator, Clive Kellner.The Thami Mnyele and Medu Art Ensemble Retrospective Exhibition opened on 30 November and runs until 30 March 2009.It is a tribute to the exiled South Africans who formed the Medu Art Ensemble in Botswana. “We want to pay homage to them for having used their courage, vision and artistic creativity to fight apartheid,” explains Kellner. The exhibition is an extraordinary account of an artistic community in exile that used its talent to speak about the conditions in their country.Zoopy TV: The Thami Mnyele and Medu Art Ensemble Retrospective Exhibition takes a look at how the fight against the apartheid machine was waged through the arts. Click arrow to play video.On show are the graphic artworks of Thami Mnyele, whose works are considered seminal to the South African art scene. An anti-apartheid stalwart, Mnyele was murdered by the apartheid government more than two decades ago.Along with works by Mnyele and other visual artists, there are poems and music. A big exhibition, it “records the struggles we had to go through in striving for a better nation,” Kellner says.The exhibition covers several rooms at the gallery, each dedicated to a specific medium, including drawings, graphics, fine arts, biographies, posters, paintings, sculptures, newsletters, documentary films, photographs, and conference papers, among others.Thami MnyeleThamsanqa “Thami” Mnyele was born in Alexandra, Johannesburg; growing up in the township, he used art to voice his concerns about South Africa’s political landscape. He was the third of five children; his father was a minister and his mother was a domestic worker.Because of his active role in politics, Mnyele was exiled to Gaborone, in Botswana. He was killed in 1985 during a cross-border raid orchestrated by the South African Defence Force (SADF). He died less than a day before he was due to relocate to Zambia. He was 37.A large collection of his art, created while in exile, was packed into a portfolio, which the SADF confiscated. The collections were later screened on SABC television by the SADF officer, Craig Williamson, as part of evidence of Mnyele’s “terrorist” activities. Those works have never been recovered.Medu Art EnsembleWhile in Botswana, Mnyele worked with the Medu Art Ensemble, which was co-founded by his friend, Mongane Wally Serote, and was dedicated to the anti-apartheid struggle. Later, it redirected its focus to music, theatre, graphics and cinema.Deputy President Baleka Mbete and musicians Hugh Masekela and Jonas Gwangwa were schooled here. Medu’s active involvement in politics led to the ensemble being targeted by the apartheid security units.In 1984, in his unpublished autobiography, Mnyele wrote: “For me as craftsman, the act of creating art should complement the act of creating shelter for my family or liberating the country for my people. This is culture.”He added: “Our work hasn’t yet developed above the mere stage of protest. We’re still moaning and pleading. And even that we do with inferior craftsmanship and insincerity. We must partake actively in the struggle to paint sincerely.”Today, the Thami Mnyele Foundation’s residency programme for African artists in Amsterdam, Holland, continues to bear testament to the late artist’s far-reaching influence.The Johannesburg Art Gallery is on King George Street in Joubert Park; it is bordered by Wolmarans and Noord streets and is open to the public on Tuesdays through Sundays from 10am to 5pm.For more information about the Thami Mnyele and Medu Art Ensemble Retrospective Exhibition, contact the gallery on +27 (0)11 725 3130.Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

Legendary SA politician dies

first_imgFrederik van Zyl Slabbert will be remembered for his liberal thinking and academic prowess. (Image: Stellenbosch University)Former opposition leader Frederik van Zyl Slabbert died in Johannesburg on 14 May. The pioneering politician died peacefully at his home, surrounded by his family, according to his daughter Tania. She survives her father, together with her brother Riko and stepmother Jane.Slabbert had been ill and had spent time in the Milpark Hospital in Johannesburg just prior to his death at the age of 70.The ruling African National Congress paid tribute to the liberal-minded politician, describing him as “legendary” and saying it deeply mourned his passing.“As leader of the Progressive Federal Party, not only did he make an indelible mark in shaping opposition politics against apartheid in South Africa, but he fought for constitutional democracy to be realised,” said party spokesperson Brian Sokutu.“He will also be remembered as one of those white South Africans who facilitated contact with the African National Congress at the time it was banned inside the country,” said Sokutu.Academic careerFrederik van Zyl Slabbert was born in Pretoria in 1940 and grew up in the Limpopo town of Polokwane – formerly Pietersburg. In 1958 he matriculated from Pietersburg Afrikaans High School, and enrolled at the Witwatersrand University for a BA degree after a brief flirtation with theological studies, with the intention of becoming a minister in the Dutch Reformed Church.An enthusiastic sports fan who had captained his school’s cricket and rugby teams, he transferred to Stellenbosch University at the end of his first year, mainly in order to play rugby. He obtained his BA in 1961, followed by an honours degree in 1962, a masters degree two years later, and a PhD in philosophy in 1967.For 10 years Slabbert lectured in sociology at Stellenbosch, Cape Town, Rhodes and Witwatersrand Universities and took up a professorship in the latter’s sociology department in 1973. Despite his brilliant political career, he retained a love for academia and was appointed chancellor of his alma mater Stellenbosch University in 2008.A heart attack at the end of that year prompted him to relinquish the post in order to spend more time with his family.Vocal oppositionWhile still studying Slabbert became interested in the plight of the Western Cape’s coloured community, an interest which led him to campaign for a position of Stellenbosch University’s Student Representative Council. But even in those days his views were considered too liberal, and he lost his bid.In 1974 he decided to make a full-time career of politics and joined the Progressive Party. In that year’s general election he stood as the party’s Parliamentary candidate for the Rondebosch constituency, snatching it from under the nose of the United Party. Slabbert managed to keep this seat for the next two general elections in 1977 and 1981.He made his name as a politician with the Progressive Party, steering it through two name changes – to the Progressive Reform Party in 1975, and then to the Progressive Federal Party in 1977. The Progressive Party’s other famous member was the late Helen Suzman who for many years stood as its only representative in Parliament.Slabbert took over as party leader in 1979 and retired unexpectedly in 1986 after declaring that a tricameral Parliament, then being mooted, was useless in the South African situation of that time. In the following year he co-founded the Institute for a Democratic Alternative for South Africa, together with fellow Member of Parliament Alex Boraine.This was the start of his secondary political career as a consultant, facilitator and analyst. In 1987 the institute organised the historic Dakar Conference, which saw Slabbert travelling with a group of white – mostly Afrikaans – South Africans to Dakar for 10 days of talks with the then-banned African National Congress.Influential businessmanFrom then on he held positions in various philanthropic organisations, such as the Open Society Foundation of Southern Africa, a funding body that promotes democracy and strong moral values, and also sat on the boards of a number of influential commercial companies, among them the Caxton CTP publishing group and Metro Cash ’n Carry.In 1990 he co-founded the black empowerment and investment company Khula, which in 1994 became a 15% shareholder of the JSE-listed Adcorp Holdings, a group that Slabbert chaired from 1998.Slabbert was also a published author who wrote or co-wrote several books including The Last White Parliament: The Struggle for South Africa, by the Leader of the White Opposition in 1986; Comrades in Business: Post-Liberation Politics in South Africa in 1998; and The Other Side of History: An Anecdotal Reflection on Political Transition in South Africa in 2006.His political and academic work earned him worldwide acclaim, and a number of awards. He was a visiting scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in November 1982 and was elected as a Fellow of Oxford University’s All Souls College. He has received honorary doctorates from KwaZulu-Natal and Free State Universities, as well as the Simon Fraser University in Canada.last_img read more

Zim hand Bafana 2-1 friendly defeat

first_img11 September 2013Zimbabwe handed a mostly South African-based Bafana Bafana a 2-1 beating in an international friendly at Orlando Stadium in Soweto on Tuesday evening.In fact, 18 of the players on the pitch at the start of the contest ply their trade in the Premier Soccer League (PSL). Goalkeeper Darren Keet was the only South African who plays his football outside of the country.CHANThe line-up revealed, perhaps, some of coach Gordon Igesund’s thinking ahead of next year’s African Nations Championships (CHAN), which take place in South Africa from 11 January to 1 February.The event will feature national teams made up of only home-based players. In the Zimbabwean match, however, Igesund was unable to select any players from Orlando Pirates, who were not considered because of club commitments.Perhaps, with the Buccaneers’ players playing in their backyard, the result might have been different, but Zimbabwe were full value for their victory.Scoring chanceThe Warriors took the game to Bafana Bafana and created a scoring chance in the very first minute, but Kaizer Chiefs striker Knowledge Musona fired high over the bar.Keet was then called on to deny Kingston Nkhatha by racing off his line to deny the Amakhosi’s man run onto a long ball.Khama Billiat enjoyed a fine game and was a constant thorn in the home team’s side. He came close with a long range effort, but was just off target.After good build-up play, Bernard Parker had a chance for Bafana Bafana 10 minutes from the break, but the Zimbabwean defence scrambled and conceded a corner.Reneilwe Letsholonyane then put in a good run, but the linesman blew the call and flagged him for being offsides.LeadFive minutes into the second half, the Warriors took the lead from a corner. After bringing the ball down smartly off his chest, Musona blasted the ball past Keet, with a powerful left-footed volley that left the goalkeeper helpless.Billiat posed another question when he tried to set Nkhatha up, but Keet was aware of the danger and came out quickly to snuff it out.Parker might have levelled for South Africa, but his header was off target, passing to the right of Washington Arubi’s goal.Tsepo Masilela narrowly missed out on scoring his first goal for Bafana Bafana in the 74th minute, but his shot frustratingly passed just over the bar.Wrong callZimbabwe should have taken a 2-0 lead 10 minutes from time, but Musona was blown up for being offside. Replays suggested the linesman got it wrong again.The match passed into time added on and four minutes after the regulation 90 Cuthbert Malajila put the Warriors two goals ahead after being set up by Nkhata, whose work left the Sundowns’ man needing only a tap-in to score.Parker snatched a late consolation goal for South Africa with a shot from distance, but there was no time left to find a second goal and Zimbabwe claimed the spoils 2-1.last_img read more

Be Heard !!

first_imgThis past week, I had the opportunity to participate in something that still seems surreal. I spent a few days in Cleveland, Ohio during the Republican National Convention. It was an incredible spectacle, and it was hard to take it all in.I was fortunate to be participating as part of the SHRM Board of Directors and the SHRM A-Team. We met with great HR pros to discuss a look ahead on how the upcoming election affected workplaces, HR and employees. If you didn’t know, SHRM attends both the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. They don’t take a political stance, and I appreciate that they are represented in both forums.The “A-Team” is a group of HR pros who are willing to advocate at the national, state and local level. They have stepped forward to make sure that the voice of employers and employees is heard by the politicians who represent all of us. If you’ve never done this, I would encourage you to get involved. Advocating makes a difference and representatives are looking to hear from us.During this time of political uncertainty, it’s needed more than ever. People share their voices and opinions with each other and on Social Media, but those have a limited reach. We are able to truly influence how the workplace is shaped if we step out past talking on forums and actually reaching our representatives.I know this may feel risky and you’re not sure if you’re up to it. However, please note that if HR doesn’t share the perspective of the employer and the employee – others will. They may not be as balanced as HR professionals are. We are in an incredible position because we represent both sides of the workplace equation.The legislative and regulatory landscape is only going to become more and more complex. I would rather see HR share directly with legislators than let them sit in a room with less context and still develop and issue new items that we will still have to implement. We need to remember that they represent us. You need to know that they are very willing to listen and are welcoming when you approach them.HR also can use this model internally. Our voice needs to be heard within the structures of our organization for the same reason that we represent both management and staff. We need to step out and not wait for things to occur and continue to be reactionary. We have the latitude and the ability to speak up intentionally for what is happening in our workplaces.Being silent and passive is not an effective way to practice HR. I encourage you to get past your anxiety and step out to lead in what we do. We can make sure that the human element of work is acknowledged, considered and included in the actions of our organizations. Being ahead of what happens to people is the exact position that HR should occupy.This week, step back and evaluate if your voice is being heard. If it isn’t then take a chance to move out into the light. When you do you’ll see that people have been waiting to hear from you !!last_img read more

Congress Gets Their Hands on Social Media

first_imgTags:#Government#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting While companies may struggle to catch on with social media, the government seems to be taking steps to do the same. We’re surprised they waited this long! According to the latest Qik blog update, both livestreaming and twittering recently took place on the floor of Congress in Capitol Hill. Is this exciting news about the progression of our government or will we regret their involvement in the future?Qik Streaming with CongressQik received a nice share of coverage today from First Congressman John Culberson when he used Qik to interview House Republican lawmakers and gain some insight on the discussion about rising energy costs and gas prices. The livestream was embedded on the CSPAN homepage with plenty of comments and discussions going on in the video’s chat. You can view the video here.Social Media and the GovernmentFirst Congressman John Culberson actually has a nice selection of livestreams from various political personnel. Culberson also has a Twitter account, where he is active with a host of followers and followings. However, the question at hand is whether or not parts of the government tinkering with social media is a good thing. Let us know your thoughts in the comments area! Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… corvida 1last_img read more

Do Unlimited Data Plans Really Matter?

first_imgWhy IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … dan rowinski Tags:#mobile#web A Sprint executive said this morning that the company plans on keeping unlimited data plans as an option for consumers. Sprint sees unlimited data as a differentiator from AT&T and Verizon and is inline with the moral high ground that it has been trying to take in regards to the prospective AT&T takeover of T-Mobile. As good as unlimited data sounds in an advertisement, does it really matter?At this point, “unlimited data” is a clever marketing ploy. Carriers are constantly learning how to upgrade their networks to handle data convergence better and then offload data use to local broadband networks. At the same time, the average consumer does not use as much data as they think. So, Sprint, it is great to keep your data options open (no throttling, no cap), but how much of this really means anything anymore?See Also:AT&T Buying T-Mobile for $39 Billion“Brazenly Anticompetitive”: Sprint Sues to Stop AT&T From Gobbling Up T-MobileAT&T + T-Mobile – The DOJ’s Case for Almost-Not-Quite-Price-FixingLawmakers Take Their First Whack at AT&T/T-Mobile MergerCan AT&T Grab T-Mobile Plus Qualcomm’s 700 MHz Spectrum?Speaking at GigaOm’s Mobilize conference in San Francisco, Sprint CTO Stephen Bye acknowledged that the carrier would indeed keep its network uncapped. According to CNET, Bye said that there are hidden costs with customer care and “support related to tiered data plans” that offsets the benefit reining in users data use.Verizon and AT&T are both throttling users in addition to various tiered data plans. T-Mobile is throttling users after a set data threshold. Sprint is the standout from that trend and to a certain extent it will cost them dollars on their margins. The company hopes that the marketing program associated with unlimited data will offset what they lose on the margins by adding new users. Sprint’s network is in a state of flux. It owns a significant portion of WiMax provider Clearwire and it needs a significant upgrade to its 3G network infrastructure. One of the reasons that Sprint went with Clearwire in the first place was to offset data along its 3G network. There is hope for a significant network infrastructure boost through its partnership with bandwidth wholesaler Lightsquared to create an LTE “4G” network, but that is going to take time to build and implement, let alone add a significant number of devices offered through the carrier that will support LTE. The CEOs of Verizon (Dan Mead), Sprint (Dan Hesse) and AT&T (Ralph de la Vega) on stage with Jim Cramer at CTIA in Orlando this spring.Really what it comes down to is that Sprint has to scratch and claw its way to keep abreast with Verizon and AT&T. Watch how CEO Dan Hesse rails against the AT&T/T-Mobile merger and you understand the position that Sprint is in trying to compete. According to CNET, Bye acknowledged that the company is under pressure to keep its network open and free vis-à-vis the competition. Unlimited Data: Worth the Cost?When AT&T announced its data throttling, it said that it will only affect the top 5% of users. At the time, the guess was that a user will bump against that threshold near 2.5 GB of data used per month. The fact of the matter is that most users will never reach 2.5 GB a month. Sprint’s margins do well by offering unlimited data for a flat rate and then users not actually using enough data to justify the plan. Granted, those margins are then in turn offset by the heaviest users, but not by that much. I have rarely met a person who exceeds 3 GB of data used on a device per month (let us know in the comments if you are one of those people and how you use your phone to consume data). Sprint is known for its posturing and pushing the limits of acceptable marketing practices. It was the first to rollout a “4G” network with WiMax, but the fact of the matter is that WiMax is not “4G” but rather an “advanced 3G” network that Sprint is allowed to market as 4G because it is considered a precursor to actual 4G. Confused yet? AT&T does the same thing with its HSPA+ network, which is also not technically 4G. Unlimited data falls into the same marketing category. Sprint will no doubt be able to get some politicians and federal regulators to buy up their marketing magic when it comes to the AT&T/T-Mobile acquisition, but the fact of the matter is that Sprint’s network is in no better shape than AT&T’s.Will it stop Sprint executives and their marketing department from touting their supposed benefits over those from their competitors? Certainly not. But, digging through Sprint’s claims, we know that they are not as altruistic as they would have us believe. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more