What’s the Point? – Graduate school of life

first_imgHomeOpinionColumnsWhat’s the Point? – Graduate school of life Mar. 03, 2020 at 6:00 amColumnsFeaturedNewsWhat’s the Point?What’s the Point? – Graduate school of lifeDavid Pisarra1 year agosmdpwhats the point columnDavid Pisarra I’m in Durban South Africa, I leave today for a photo safari to see the lions, giraffes and about a gazillion birds. For the past few days I have been in the third largest city in the country, in the state of Kwa-Zulu Natal. It’s an absolutely gorgeous, lush, subtropical state. The humidity is mild, the countryside is very green, and it is on the east coast abutting the Indian Ocean, I think it is the second largest harbor in the country.This city is a bit of a mash up of Santa Monica, with a heavy emphasis on the tourist experience, a solid dose of Long Beach/San Pedro with its long shipping history of import/export and a heavy, heavy dose of inner city poverty.The hotel I’m staying in is called Quarters (http://www.quarters.co.za) and it’s a lovely campus of four old Victorian buildings that have been renovated to accommodate guests. Originally built in the early 1900s they possess the quaintness and charm of old world grace. The black and white tiled bath is like a step back to the 20s – I’m in heaven. From the moment of my first phone call to confirm that someone would be available to let me in, I have been enrobed in a polished and professional standard of care that thinks deeply about the guest experience. From the personalized, hand signed welcome letter of the hotel manager in my room to the black ribbon that surrounds the facecloth in the bath to make sure it stays folded properly, nothing has been overlooked here.Ryan is the duty manager I have had the most interaction with, and his soothing South African accented (to my ears) voice is simply the most reassuringly positive experience of this exciting country. He was the one who confirmed for me that he will be checking me in when I arrive. He is the one who has provided much needed guidance about where to walk and what to see. He is the insightful guide who warned me off those areas that are not tourist safe. In short he has been the local host that we all want when traveling.We would describe this hotel as a boutique hotel. It’s a lovely change from the corporate monoliths that say they do customer service, but fall short on a regular basis of making one feel welcome. I’ve been called “Sir” and “Mr. Pisarra” more here in the last four days than probably the last ten years combined.This is a beach city, and so of course I had to walk the promenade. At one end is the Ushaka Marine World and tourist experience. More than a dozen shops offer everything from a wide assortment of spices which caters to the heavy Indian population in this multi-cultural city, to the classic rip-off of American hamburger fast food restaurants, called WIMPY. Yes, like in the Popeye cartoons…There’s the reptile exhibit, I didn’t partake, and a theme restaurant called the Cargo Hold which used to be an actual working ship, that’s been relocated and turned into a semi-fine dining experience.Walking along the Golden Mile here is like strolling from the Santa Monica Pier to the Venice pier. There’s the usual array of beach barkers selling trinkets and ice cream, but also some very talented sand artists who are homeless youth, trained by the city to do art, so they can provide for themselves a bit. The tourists like me, take pictures and then donate a few Rand to the artists. It’s nice to know that the entrepreneurial spirit thrives globally, even in the most destitute, perhaps because of their desperation, of places.Then there is the overwhelming feeling of sadness at the poverty and I wondered how so many people could be lifted out of it into a world of better living conditions. I thought of the programs and support that the City of Santa Monica provides and yet we still have tremendous homeless and poor population. I compare the destitute in Los Angeles with the destitute in Durban and question which is better? Maybe neither. Maybe the truth is that there will always be poor, and there will always be those who work to pull themselves up and those who can’t, won’t or don’t.My brother is with me, and we went today to the Nelson Mandela Museum that was erected where he was arrested. It’s a soul expanding experience when you see the history of Apartheid laid out, with his life interwoven. The cruelty that was perpetrated is astounding. The tools of the oppressors from segregation, even at the beaches, the blacks had theirs, the Indians and coloureds each had a beach and of course the whites. The controlling whites used “pass papers” to control the movements of those they dominated. It made me question what is happening in my own country as we move to a “Real ID” system that is necessary to travel interstate on the airlines. Is this the start of the next phase of control?My friend Anne says that travel is the “graduate school of life”, she’s right. It is by traveling that we get to see the commonalities of life, the human potential that exists across all lands and the basic humanity that actually unites us, once we get past the artificial “differences” of skin color, politics, and money.David Pisarra is a Los Angeles Divorce and Child Custody Lawyer specializing in Father’s and Men’s Rights with the Santa Monica firm of Pisarra & Grist. He welcomes your questions and comments. He can be reached at [email protected] or 310/664-9969. You can follow him on Twitter @davidpisarraTags :smdpwhats the point columnshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentLetter To The Editor – Bernie vs. ObamaSamohi takes on Serra High in tonight’s playoffsYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall6 hours agoColumnsOpinionYour Column HereBring Back Library ServicesGuest Author12 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson17 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter17 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor17 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press17 hours agolast_img read more

Martin McGuinness headstone unveiled

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Google+ WhatsApp Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Previous articleRugby Review: City of Derry stay upNext articleInishowen League Results News Highland Google+ Martin McGuinness’ headstone has been unveiled today in Derry.The former Deputy First Minister died last month.The headstone was unveiled today in the Republican plot at the City Cemetry in Derry following an Easter Commemoration through the Bogside.Sinn Féin Foyle MLA Raymond McCartney said Martin and Dale Moore who was also remembered this weekend will continue to inspire and encourage us in the time ahead. They believed that a better Ireland, a genuinely new Ireland is possible. WhatsApp Twitter Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growscenter_img Pinterest Twitter Martin McGuinness headstone unveiled By News Highland – April 16, 2017 Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty DL Debate – 24/05/21 Harps come back to win in Waterford Facebook News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterestlast_img read more

Premium / On the wires: Yet another sign a Swissport IPO attempt is coming?

first_imgBy Alessandro Pasetti 29/07/2019 New Premium subscriber REGISTER Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium Email* Please either REGISTER or login below to continue Reset << Go back “Swissport Group (together with its subsidiaries, “Swissport”) intends to refinance some of Swissport’s outstanding debt. The anticipated proceeds from the refinancing are expected to be used to repay/redeem existing debt. Estimated revenue for the first half of 2019 increased to €1.526bn compared to €1.437bn in the first half of 2018 (or €1.472bn in constant currency).” – Swissport, 29 July 2019.Signs: The refinancing deal that is being sought comprises: a new €75m revolving credit facility; a new €50m delayed draw loan ... Premium subscriber LOGIN Forgotten your password? Please click here LOGIN Reset Your Password Please Login Email* Password*last_img read more

Brexit News / Fashion returns bound up in post-Brexit red tape, raising costs for SMEs

first_imgID 69750723 © Martinmark | Dreamstime.com “This is because the problems impeding our business are things like courier surcharges and returns procedures, which couldn’t be known until the deal was finalised.”The fashion label owner said it had not been able to address the problem of handling returns from the EU, and refusals have been increasing as EU consumers find themselves having to pay duty.The owner said: “We decided to stop shipping to the EU in January because of the confusion surrounding duty, surcharges and VAT, but one shipment got through. This was refused by the customer, so we were charged £50 in refusal fees by our courier, on top of the initial delivery charge, plus there’s the outbound and inbound duty and duty when it originally came from our manufacturing plant, all for a product we could not sell.“It’s easier to sell to the US, because they have a threshold of $850 before duties and sale tax is required and their customers know they will be charged this.”Asked if that suggested this was just a learning curve for EU customers, the fashion label owner replied “potentially”, but noted that the EU was a huge market in terms of fashion brands and questioned whether they would need to shop for UK goods.“Maybe in five to 10 years, the UK will be able to sell there, but it would mean we need to set up a second website that does not include VAT,” said the owner.“Because we’re a micro-business, we simply do not have the human resources to manage two websites, and we have started doing duty-paid, but the costs have put customers off because it is so much more expensive.“Which is why, in reality, a lot of UK labels have just stopped and have accepted they will lose EU business until, or if, they get big enough to hold stock there.”Efforts to engage government have also seemingly fallen on deaf ears; a letter from Fashion Roundtable calling on government to address the difficulties facing SMEs in the fashion sector is still to receive a response.“It’s disappointing that government has not responded and it’s concerning, given the size of the fashion industry,” added the label’s owner. Refusals and returns represent a major impediment to UK SMEs seeking to re-establish an EU foothold, with many considering the US an easier market.Owners of both an independent record label and fashion label said they had received scant advice from HMRC in the run-up to Brexit, the latter noting that webinars had been designed for larger businesses.“We’re an SME and we were being directed to watch a webinar discussing weapons exports to the EU, much bigger operations than ours,” the fashion label owner told The Loadstar.“You’ll hear people saying things like ‘you had four years to prepare’, but to them I say, so too did government. We followed all the advice HMRC provided on preparing ourselves adequately for Brexit, but none of it has helped in dealing with the troubles we are facing.center_img By Alex Whiteman, Brexit reporter 07/04/2021last_img read more

“Slowly marching to our graves”: Restaurants, landlords fear winter will bring chill to open-air dining

first_imgTagsBill de BlasioCoronavirusNYC Restaurants Share via Shortlink The city may extend “Open Restaurants” into winter, but owners and landlords fear business will sink along with the temperature (Image: iStock)Since opening ilili in 2008, restaurateur Philippe Massoud had expanded his upscale Lebanese eatery to three locations around Manhattan. But Covid cut deeply into his business — as it did with thousands of others across the city — forcing Massoud to close two locations and exit those leases. He has managed to keep his Flatiron District venue alive after spending nearly $20,000 on pricey umbrellas, planters, tables and chairs to take advantage of the city’s outdoor dining program.But with winter in the distance and unanswered questions about how open-air dining will operate in frigid temperatures, Massoud was apprehensive and a bit poetic about the future.ilili’s outdoor setup, tailored for the warm months (Courtesy of ilili)“We are first of all partners with Mother Earth and the weather,” Massoud said. But he added, if city officials “don’t want the real estate market to crash, and they don’t want a 1929-style cataclysmic depression, they better come up with something, because we are slowly marching to our graves.”The city’s Open Restaurants program, which began in June, has eased outdoor dining regulations on businesses. With indoor dining still prohibited in the five boroughs and no word on when it may return, Mayor Bill de Blasio extended the program through Oct. 31 — it was originally to end on Labor Day — with the possibility it could last into winter. But that potential has so far come without new guidance for restaurants whose outdoor spaces — on sidewalks and streets — cannot have a fixed roof.“Ambiguity makes life challenging for restaurant operators,” said Taylor Mondshein, executive search consultant at the Elliot Group.The same goes for landlords who are already grappling with tenants unable to pay their full rent and many others who have bailed out entirely.According to the New York City Hospitality Alliance’s July survey, 71 percent of restaurant and bar owners said landlords have not waived any of their rent, and about 60 percent said landlords had not deferred rent or renegotiated their lease.Out in the coldFew industry pros interviewed saw long-term viability in outdoor dining, especially when the cold weather comes.“I think that people are expecting there to be some form of indoor dining by [the winter],” said Alex Victor, a partner in the law firm Davidoff Hutcher & Citron, which represents over 100 bars and restaurants in New York. Outside the city, New York restaurants have for weeks been serving diners indoors at 50 percent of capacity and the Covid infection rate has continued to ebb.Under city regulations, sidewalk cafes can install portable natural gas heaters only after receiving approval from both the Department of Buildings and the Fire Department. Only two different models of heaters and one type of gas hose are approved for use.Current guidelines show approval can take at least 25 business days and entail nearly $200 in fees.That’s in addition to the heaters themselves, which can run anywhere from $150 to $1,000 each, according to Jennifer Carpenter, a principal at Verona Carpenter Architects.“In New York, the only way people will come sit outside in the winter [is] if they are comfortable,” Carpenter said. “It’s going to be something that’s necessary. The bigger question is the economics of, ‘even if I pack my outdoor cafe [with heaters], can I stay open?’”Roughly 9,000 restaurants have been approved for the city’s Open Restaurants program, keeping an estimated 80,000 people employed, city officials said.But many of those restaurant owners are struggling to pay the bills. Last month, 83 percent of eateries did not pay full rent and 37 percent paid no rent at all, according to the Hospitality Alliance’s survey of nearly 500 restaurant and bar owners.Paul Ficalora, a restaurant broker and real estate agent, said whatever the city does to ease outdoor dining in the winter likely won’t be enough for many restaurant owners to pay the bills and the rent.“There are city people that are walking away,” he said, “and looking for opportunities north of the city.”Contact Sasha Jones at [email protected]center_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

California’s advanced energy job sector grew six times faster than statewide employment rate

first_imgCalifornia’s advanced energy job sector grew six times faster than statewide employment rateData from the Advanced Energy Economy reveals more than half a million people in California work in the advanced energy industry; growth ratio of 18% last year six times faster than average. April 13, 2016 pv magazine Finance Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share More than 500,000 people work in California’s advanced energy industry, new data from the Advanced Energy Economy (AEE) has revealed this week. The sector, which includes energy efficiency, advanced electricity generation, biofuels, advanced grid technology and advanced vehicles, employs far more people than the motion picture, TV and radio industry (145,000) and agriculture, forestry and fishing (475,000) and – at a growth rate of 18% last year – is closing in on the construction industry for the state, which employs 750,000 people. According to AEE, the sector’s growth rate was six times that of California’s average employment rate of 3%, and the state boasts the largest fleet of clean and advanced energy experts of any across the nation. Broken down by sector, energy efficiency employs the bulk of people, comprising 320,000 employees, or 63% of workers in the advanced energy field. However, in terms of growth, the advanced generation sector is the shining star, adding 48,000 new jobs last year to hit a growth rate of 50%. And of this figure, 80% of jobs were created in the solar industry. Hybrid, electric and natural gas vehicles – which comprise the advanced transportation segment – added 7,000 new workers in 2015 at a growth rate of 65%, while the number of Californian companies engaged in some form of advanced energy reached 43,000. “With triple the job growth rate of any other sector in our state, clean energy is a major source of job creation in California,” said Kevin de Leon, senate president Pro Tem for Los Angeles. “This report shows that policy supporting clean energy is not just good for California’s environment and air, but also for our economy.” Solar’s impressive growth tracks a national trend that saw the industry add 35,000 jobs between November 2014 and November 2015, according to the Solar Foundation’s Solar Jobs Consensus. This represented the third consecutive year of ~20% growth, with solar installers comprising approximately half of the entire workforce. There are now 209,000 solar workers nationwide, with California home to 76,000 of that workforce.Popular content ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Submarine cable to connect 10.5 GW wind-solar complex in Morocco to the UK grid Emiliano Bellini 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com UK-based Xlinks is planning to build 10.5 GW of wind and solar in Morocco and sell the power generated by the huge plant in the UK. 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The re… Submarine cable to connect 10.5 GW wind-solar complex in Morocco to the UK grid Emiliano Bellini 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com UK-based Xlinks is planning to build 10.5 GW of wind and solar in Morocco and sell the power generated by the huge plant in the UK. This should be ma… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. In the Europea… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.… Solar pavement for historic square in Barcelona Pilar Sánchez Molina 30 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The municipal government of Barcelona is supporting the development of a 50-square-meter pilot project to test the feasi… ESG criteria: Should developers take notice? 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Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… 123456Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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Michael Fuhs 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Something is brewing in the financial world. “Sustainable finance” and the growth of ESG funds have been taking the mark… Curtailing corrosion: making mounting structures last pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Raw material quality is vital for solar power plants, particularly given higher expectations for their lifetimes, as 30+… pv magazine test: February 2021 results pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com We are pleased to report on the next batch of energy yield results from the outdoor test field in Xi’an, China. We prese… Battery testing builds certainty pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Owners and operators of energy storage systems, as well as investors, need transparent ways to evaluate battery performance. Polysilicon from Xinjiang: a balanced view pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As of March, the United States and Europe were considering sanctions on polysilicon from Xinjiang, China, due to concerns over forced labor. Final thought: Solar ethics, forced labor pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Abigail Ross Hopper, President and CEO, Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA)Issue 04 – 2021 April 7, 2021 pv maga… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

Knockout City will be available on Xbox Game Pass, EA Play at launch

first_imgJames BatchelorEditor-in-ChiefTuesday 27th April 2021Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleElectronic ArtsVelan StudiosElectronic Arts has announced that upcoming multiplayer title Knockout City will launch day-and-date on its EA Play subscription service — and, by extension, Xbox Game Pass.The game, developed by Mario Kart Live: Home Circuit creator Velan Studios, throws players into cartoonish dodgeball matches and is due for release across PC and all consoles on May 21.In a blog post, the publisher announced it will also be available to subscribers of EA Play from day one. This is a rarity for the service, which primarily features back catalogue games and time-limited trials of its latest releases. Due to EA Play’s inclusion in Xbox Game Pass Ultimate, the upper tier of Microsoft’s own subscription offering, Knockout City will also be available from day one on that service. Again, this is unusual; while Microsoft’s first-party games and selected independent titles have launched day-and-date on Game Pass, little to no titles from AAA publishers have done so.It’s worth noting Knockout City is not a top tier EA title. For those wishing to purchase it individually, the game will only cost $19.99 — no doubt with plans to monetise the customisation options in what is shaping up to be a live service game with ongoing updates and expansions.EA also announced a Deluxe Edition, with a selection of said customisations. It will cost $29.98 when combined with the standard edition, but EA Play and Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscribers need only pay the $9.99 extra. Related JobsEnvironment Artists – New IP South East Creative AssemblyLead Sound Designer South East Creative AssemblyRemote Environment Artist Console Studio UK UK & Europe Big PlanetDiscover more jobs in games EA Play Pro subscribers will get the Deluxe Edition at no extra cost.We spoke to Guha Bala, co-founder of Velan Studios, during this month’s GI Live: Online conference, in which he told us the story of the journey from the Bala brothers previous studio Vicarious Visions to making Knockout City.You can watch the full interview here.last_img read more

Drivers preview virtual Texas: ‘It’s the hot thing to do’

first_imgIf you didn’t know better, NASCAR drivers were preparing for a race at Texas Motor Speedway this weekend as they would any other season. And even with a pause on the national sports scene because of the COVID-19 pandemic, NASCAR is still going to be racing at Texas – only this week it will do so with a popular twist.Sunday’s O’Reilly Auto Parts 125 (1 p.m. ET available on FOX – where available and subject to change, FS1 and the FOX Sports App) is the second race of the eNASCAR iRacing Pro Invitational Series that has captivated NASCAR’s best racers and, equally as importantly, thrilled NASCAR’s large and loyal fanbase, which can count itself fortunate to still have the ability to watch so many of its favorites compete – albeit virtually.RELATED: FOX Sports to air eNASCAR races |  iRacing scratches drivers’ competitive itch“What a wonderful opportunity for the sport, for racing in general,” said Stewart-Haas Racing driver Clint Bowyer, who last week served as an in-race commentator for the FS1 television broadcast and finished 16th out 35 in the opening race. “iRacing has been around a long time and it’s just something that keeps evolving and they’ve perfected. Here we all are, just longing for some sports action, some competitive action that we can broadcast and show a fan, and then – boom – here it is in our lap.”Certainly there was a bit of a learning curve for some of these NASCAR regulars in last week’s opener at the virtual Homestead-Miami Speedway. Denny Hamlin edged Dale Earnhardt Jr. in a dramatic bump-and-run on the last lap. iRacing regular Timothy Hill finished third, followed by Chase Briscoe and pole winner Garrett Smithley.Hill and Smithley, who compete for smaller teams in the NASCAR Cup Series, may not be race favorites on the real track yet, but they are strong and experienced iRacers who turned some heads with their performances last week. And they competed with a comparatively modest set-up – steering wheels attached to their desks at home with a single computer screen. Hamlin, for example, sat in a rig with roll-bars and three computer screens – a set-up he estimated probably cost upward of $40,000.Both Hill and Smithley said this week’s virtual race on the notoriously tough 1.5-mile Texas high banks will be an entirely new test for the field because its new repave has only recently been updated in the iRacing format.“It’s so neat with iRacing how they laser-scan these race tracks and it’s identical to real-life,” Hill explained. “So, Texas was repaved not too long ago and iRacing went down there and scanned the new re-pave and actually for iRacing. We’ve been running the old pavement up until this year. They’ve just recently come out with the new race track, so I’ve never even been on it yet.”That new competitive element may well come into play. But regardless, many of NASCAR’s top drivers have spent the week upping their iRacing game with much more practice or even a new simulator.Two-time and reigning NASCAR Cup Series champion Kyle Busch finished 29th Sunday, driving friend Ty Gibbs’ sim rig with very little practice on it. Busch said he went to great lengths to borrow a sim for his home this week. And to practice.“So now, after we put Brexton (Busch, son) to bed, I can go down there and start working on getting better,” Busch explained. “Texas seems like it’s going to be a heck of a lot more simple than Homestead was as far as the driving aspect. You just have to hit your marks in Turns 1 and 2 and get back to the gas in Turns 3 and 4, which are going to be wide open.”His Joe Gibbs Racing teammate, Erik Jones, who finished 10th last week at virtual Homestead, is equally enthusiastic about another chance in the competition. Jones conceded, however, he wasn’t able to put as much practice time in as he may have wanted this week because he is moving – the opposite scenario of what he’s expecting from the competition.“I honestly did not know how I’d do in last week’s race at Homestead,” said Jones, who drives the No. 20 Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota in the NASCAR Cup Series. “It had been forever since I last went iRacing, so it was like I was a rookie all over again. But things came to me fairly quickly, although I’m still nowhere near where I want to be.“Performance aside, I think we all came away from that race impressed with how the entire industry rallied around it, and fans seemed to like it, too. Now we’re on big FOX this Sunday, so even more people will be watching. Obviously, that’s good, but it does kind of ramp up the pressure. You want to do well. Even though it’s a simulation, we’re all competitors and we want to win.” Bowyer confirmed as much.“It reminds me of a rookie coming into the Cup Series,” Bowyer said. “You’re up against guys who have been doing it for years, decades and you’re expected to jump right into the deep end and compete with them and run door-to-door with them and beat them.“The pressure is on for all of us to gain that almighty seat time as much as we can. During the evenings and during the days, whenever you can jump on it, we’re all doing it.”Bowyer, Busch, Jones, Hamlin, you name it. So many of the sport’s top names are certainly all onboard with this opportunity to simultaneously stay on their game and provide good racing for the fans. The chance to showcase the sport again nationally on the FOX network is a huge plus, and both competitors and fans seem to be enjoying this new normal.“Everyone’s doing it – it’s the hot thing to do – and it was certainly fun to do last weekend to help everyone forget about everything that is happening in the real world,” Busch said. “Everyone seems to enjoy it. A lot of guys are getting a little more serious about it and everyone is spending more time on it, so I figured if I’m going to stop running 30th, I’m going to need to get some more laps.” 00:0000:0000:00LIVEFacebookTwitterEmailEmbedSETTINGS_SPEEDSPEED_NORMALSETTINGS_AUTOPLAYlast_img read more

First American With Drug-Resistant Epilepsy Has Great Success With Newly-Approved ‘Brain Stimulation’

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreFor the first time in America since the procedure was approved for commercial use last year, scientists have successfully treated a patient for drug-resistant epilipsy with a technique called “deep brain stimulation” (DBS).DBS is a minimally-invasive surgical therapy that uses an implanted medical device, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, to deliver electrical stimulation to precisely targeted areas of the brain as adjunctive treatment for several neurological disorders – including depression.In April 2018, the FDA granted pre-market approval for Medtronic DBS therapy as adjunctive treatment for reducing the frequency of partial-onset seizures in individuals 18 years of age or older who are drug-resistant to three or more anti-epileptic medications. The approval was based on results from the SANTE trial (Stimulation of the Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in Epilepsy), where patients had a median seizure frequency reduction of 75% at seven years post-implant.RELATED: Exciting New Study Shows That Zapping the Brain ‘Acutely’ Relieves Symptoms of DepressionDuring DBS, thin stimulation electrodes are placed into deep regions of the brain that control various functions. A pacemaker implanted in the chest sends electrical impulses through the electrodes, which regularizes abnormal brain activity and alleviates symptoms.DBS therapy for epilepsy delivers controlled electrical pulses to a target in the brain called the anterior nucleus of the thalamus (ANT), which is part of a network involved in seizures.Dr. Robert E. Gross completed the first case in the U.S. since the procedure was FDA-approved and made available commercially. That procedure was conducted at Emory University Hospital in November 2018 – and according to a university statement in February, the patient is doing well.WATCH: He Was Called Foolish for His Research; Now Documentary Tells How He Won Nobel Prize for ‘Cancer Cure’“The commercial availability of DBS provides an important surgical treatment option for patients who suffer from epilepsy and do not respond to medication,” says Gross. “ANT DBS has been shown to significantly reduce the frequency and severity of seizures and improve quality of life out to seven years.”“While it has only been two months since the system was turned on, his frequency of seizures has declined by more than 50%, and we expect improvement to increase further with additional programming sessions.”The second case at Emory took place on February 21st and researchers are eager to witness its continued success.CHECK OUT: Years After She Smells Parkinson’s Disease on Her Husband, Woman is Now Paving the Way for Early Detection TestAccording to the American Epilepsy Society, as many as three million Americans have epilepsy. Antiepileptic drug (AED) medication is the primary treatment to control seizures; however, approximately one third of individuals with epilepsy have seizures that do not successfully respond to AEDs. In the SANTE trial, all subjects had tried at least three AEDs and, on average, lived with epilepsy for 22 years prior to treatment with DBS.The Medtronic DBS System for Epilepsy has demonstrated safety and effectiveness in patients who averaged six or more seizures per month over the three most recent months (with no more than 30 days between seizures) and has not been evaluated in patients with less frequent seizures.In addition to medically refractory epilepsy, DBS therapy is currently approved in many locations around the world, including the United States and Europe, for the treatment of the disabling symptoms of essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease.(Reprinted from Emory University)Treat Your Friends With A Daily Dose Of Good News By Sharing This To Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Sanders responds to Trump press conference

first_imgVermont Business Magazine US Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) issued the following statement Tuesday after President Donald Trump held a press conference where he blamed “both sides” for violence at a white supremacist demonstration in Charlottesville, Virginia:”President Trump. You are embarrassing our country and the millions of Americans who fought and died to defeat Nazism. The violence in Charlottesville was not caused by the ‘alt-left,’ (whatever that may be). It was caused by Neo-Nazis and white supremacists who are attempting to spread their hateful and racist ideology.”BURLINGTON, Vt., Aug. 15 – U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders Trump Defends Initial Remarks on Charlottesville; Again Blames ‘Both Sides'(link is external)New York Timeslast_img read more