Richmond Monster Energy Series pit stall assignments

first_imgSee where your favorite driver will pit for Saturday’s Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond Raceway (7:30 p.m. ET, FOX, MRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio).last_img

Rhode Island Man Trains for EMT despite Challenges

first_imgNews, Weather and Classifieds for Southern New England NORTH PROVIDENCE, R.I. (TurnTo10) – A Rhode Island man, who has overcome adversity in his life, is hoping to make a difference for others. This weekend he’s completing his training as an EMT, despite facing his own physical challenges.last_img

Community comes together to celebrate Las Posadas

first_imgNatalie Weber | The Observer Community members gather for an observance of Las Posadas. The celebration commemorates Mary and Joseph’s search for lodging in Bethlehem. Here the group is led by Cristian Araujo and Andres Walliser, who portrayed Mary and Joseph respectively.“Las Posadas is a commemoration of the walk of Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem to find a place for Jesus to stay,” she said. “This is done in the Latino tradition, and in my case, I’m very familiar with the Mexican tradition of doing it through song.”First brought to campus by former Farley Hall rector Elaine DeBassige, Las Posadas is traditionally held over the course of nine days, but is shortened to three at Notre Dame. Members of the community gathered at Duncan Hall on Wednesday evening for the second night of the celebration.The event began with prayer and readings from the Bible and a theological work. Then, participants, who stood outside the building, sang a back-and-forth hymn with a group of Duncan Hall residents, who stood inside the dorm. The hymn reenacted the exchange between Joseph, Mary and innkeepers who turned them away from lodging in Bethlehem.After being turned away from Duncan, more than 30 Notre Dame community members walked to McGlinn Hall, where they listened to readings, sang the hymn to seek shelter and were turned away once again. They then journeyed over to Keough Hall, where the celebration concluded, and the pilgrims were finally accepted into the dorm.Becky Ruvalcaba, who serves as Campus Ministry’s assistant director of multicultural ministry, said the Spanish title, Las Posadas, translates to “shelter” in English. “I think it’s another way for us to really celebrate this Advent season, really having a visual representation of that journey that we all take, that we all should be taking during this season — and really seeking to be able to have Jesus have shelter in our hearts,” she said. Senior and Anchor intern Cecily Castillo said Las Posadas can also remind people to reflect on the modern day social concerns involving shelter and refuge, such as immigration and homelessness.“I think listening to each of the reflections and the readings, … it really sets our minds and our hearts on to bigger picture concerns that come up at this type of year,” she said. “So we really remember that, because in our faith, there should always be something that we can use to not only point ourselves towards God, but point ourselves into the concerns of others.”Senior Andres Walliser, who portrayed Joseph on Wednesday night, also reflected on the connections between the tradition and modern day concerns.“Going through the readings for each station is really relevant now,” he said. “It’s cool to tie our faith and the Church and how the Church has a role in immigration issues right now.”Sophomore Cristian Araujo, who portrayed Mary, said even though she’s not Catholic, Las Posadas allowed her to connect with other members of the Latino community at Notre Dame, and learn more about the Catholic faith.“It’s not necessarily just a Latino thing,” she said. “It’s just a cultural thing, just one of the many celebrations we have.”Walliser also encouraged students to come to the celebration.“For any cultural event, any Latino event we put on, I’m always happy to see people from outside the community, outside the culture,” he said. “I never people as outsiders. I always see ‘That’s really cool that someone’s interested in our thing.’”John Draves, a junior in the Old College seminary, came to Las Posadas for the first time Wednesday night because he knows Anchor interns Robledo and Castillo, and knew other people from his dorm who would be attending. He said during a busy time in the school year, Las Posadas can help students celebrate the season of Advent and prepare for Christmas.“[Las Posadas] doesn’t take too much time,” he said. “It’s nothing too hard to do. It’s something that anyone can just join in. It helps us commemorate this season in a more small, but yet intentional, way.”The final night of Las Posadas will begin Thursday at 8 p.m. in Fisher Hall.Tags: Advent, Campus Ministry, Las Posadas Senior Carolina Robledo always looked forward to Las Posadas — a modern day reenactment of the Christmas story — as a young child. It was a fun way to pray, and the kids always got bags of candy at the end.Now, as an Anchor intern with Campus Ministry, Robledo helped organize Notre Dame’s celebration of Las Posadas this year.last_img read more

Denise van Outen Will Put on Her Jazz Shoes as Velma Kelly in London’s Chicago

first_imgDenise van Outen in a promotional photo for “Chicago”(Photo provided by Raw PR) Chicago alum Denise van Outen will re-join the West End cast of the hit musical revival on September 24, taking on the role of Velma Kelly for a limited engagement at the Phoenix Theatre through November 17. Van Outen replaces current Chicago star Josefina Gabrielle.New to the role of Velma, Van Outen was formerly seen as Roxie Hart in Chicago in London and on Broadway. Her other London stage credits include Tell Me on a Sunday, Legally Blonde, Rent and her solo show Some Girl I Used to Know. On TV, van Outen currently judges Ireland’s Got Talent, having previously judged BBC1’s Any Dream Will Do and I’d Do Anything alongside Andrew Lloyd Webber.Van Outen will join a Chicago cast that includes Alexandra Burke as Roxie Hart, Duncan James as Billy Flynn, Mazz Murray as Mama Morton and Paul Rider as Amos Hart.Based on the play by Maurine Dallas Watkins, Chicago features a book by Fred Ebb and Bob Fosse, music by John Kander and lyrics by Ebb. The production features choreography by Ann Reinking in the style of Fosse and direction by Walter Bobbie. View Commentslast_img read more

RunSignUp introduces Virtual Race TXT Service

first_imgRunSignUp has introduced a new TXT Service for Virtual Races. According to the technology provider, this ‘transforms virtual events into vibrant participatory events and connects athletes in remote locations.’RunSignUp notes that virtual races – events in which participants sign up to run a prescribed distance at a location and time of their choice and self-report their results – have grown in popularity in recent years. This is seen to create a demand for more interactivity with virtual participants.Virtual races can take two forms:Standalone event, often with a broad range of time (weeks or months) for participation from competitors in disparate locations.Add-on to an existing in-person event, allowing runners who are unable to participate due to geographic distance, time constraints, or participation caps to join in the festivities from a distance. Add-on events can often appeal to previous participants, family members of friends of current participants, or supporters of a race’s cause.Many virtual events ask participants to report their race times and collate them into results. Virtual TXT Service allows race organizers to communicate with virtual racers in pre-set text exchanges, and lets the participant respond back with their time for the event.These responses are fully integrated with the RunSignUp Results platform, allowing the participant to be added to official results with an auto-calculation of pace and age-grading, as well as personal finisher pages and finisher certificates.RunSignUp adds that ‘People can even sign up for txt notifications alerting them when a virtual runner reports a finish time – just like spectators can get notifications about the finish of a ‘real’ race.’Virtual TXT Service can be used to enhance virtual events in a variety of ways, including to send a video, offer congratulations, or provide a coupon from a sponsor. It can also bring ‘a sense of community and accomplishment of a typical race day to an otherwise isolated athletic feat.’Setup of the service is flexible, allowing for custom messages, time ranges for reporting that can be broad or narrow; and race directors can elect to post times automatically or require approval before posting. RunSignUp is a leading technology provider for races and timers in the United States. More than 16,000 races use RunSignUp to manage their events, registering more than 4 million participants each year. RunSignUp’s platform provides a hub for registration, fundraising, race promotion and race day management, with a convenient CRM view of a races’ participants, donors, sponsors, and more.RunSignUp products include RaceDay Timer product offerings, RunSignUp Clubs program to enable membership management, and RaceJoy for live tracking and race day mobile experiences.Customers include leading organizations such as the Boilermaker Road Race, Crim Festival of Races, Amway River Bank Run, Philadelphia Marathon, Komen Race for the Cure Philadelphia, Mercedes Marathon, Kentucky Derby Festival, Silicon Valley Turkey Trot, Vermont City Marathon, Sports Backers, Race Day Events, Glass City Marathon, Tulsa Run, Space Coast Marathon, Leone Timing, KC Running Company, Compuscore Timing, Knoxville Track Club, Pikes Peak Road Runners, Gulf Coast Runners, Columbus Running Company, Playmakers Running Store and many more.RunSignUp adds that it is founded by runners for runners, using technology innovation to benefit the running community.www.RunSignUp.comrunsignup.wordpress.com/2018/11/02/virtual-race-txt-service Relatedlast_img read more

Horizon stare still best option to find sea legs

first_imgNew Zealand Herald:There is little doubt that the dreaded mal de mer or seasickness is one of the worst and most debilitating of ailments that strike those trying to enjoy a day at sea.It is a peculiar malady, seemingly attacking people at random.Some of the worst boaties I have known – in terms of their ability, seamanship and knowledge of how things work – are the least affected by seasickness and can happily party on in the worst of conditions.Read more: New Zealand Herald More of our Members in the Media >last_img

Walker: Mental Health

first_imgBy AARON WALKERIndependent Candidate Los Alamos County CouncilThroughout my campaign I have stated the need for honesty and transparency in our government, and it’s time for me to honor that need by having a discussion regarding mental health. I have been running my campaign at full steam since late May when I was trying to get on the ballot. Since then, it has been a roller coaster of emotions with some highs, lows, and a ton of anticipation.At times, my mental health has suffered under the weight of the self-induced pressure. I’ve questioned some of my strategies and wondered if I’ve done enough. I have had tremendous support from my wife, friends, and family that have been very encouraging throughout this whole process. I’ve bounced back with renewed motivation and vigor each time, but only because I have learned the tools I’ve needed over the years.Mental health is a big issue within our community, and it’s time that people in the spotlight start talking about it so that people (especially our youth) understand that it is okay to talk about it. Struggling with mental health is not a sign of weakness, and there is nothing “wrong” with it. We must find a way to make people comfortable talking about their struggles, and it starts with having this conversation publicly. Again, it is okay to not be okay.Los Alamos County has a myriad of services at its disposal regarding health services, including the health council. I would like to see those services leveraged to provide better mental health services within the county, especially to our teens and youth. I want to see if we can provide better services at the schools, as well as the teen center. We need more providers for mental health services for children within our community as well. We need to foster an environment that gives our teens and youth the tools they need to better confront mental health issues when they come up. These tools will prove extremely valuable as they navigate the waters of stepping into adulthood, and throughout their lives.It’s not just our youth that need better services. We need more/better services for the adults within our community as well. Again, that would mean finding more providers for these services and having a discussion at multiple levels on how to increase their availability. I also want to look at the possibility of “traveling” providers that could assist our senior population at our senior centers in Los Alamos and White Rock, as well as our senior housing locations.If we are to continue to have a wonderful community, we need to address the hard topics. We need to have discussions that may be hard to talk about. Mental health is one of those discussions. I will say right now that I struggle with mental health sometimes, and that is OKAY. It doesn’t define me or make me a weak person. It makes me human being with real emotions and real feelings. I am willing to discuss this openly and honestly, and it’s time we start erasing the stigma of mental health.last_img read more

Manhattan Project Lecture: Life Of Scientist Harold Urey

first_imgThe cover of the new biography of Nobel Prize-winning chemist Harold Urey (1893–1981), The Life and Science of Harold C. Urey, by Matthew Shindell. Courtesy/LAHS Smithsonian Curator Matthew Shindell discusses Manhattan Project scientist Harold Urey online at 6 p.m., Oct. 13 as part of the Los Alamos Historical Society Lecture Series. Courtesy/LAHSLos Alamos Historical Society News:The community is invited to join the Los Alamos Historical Society online at 6 p.m., Oct. 13 for a fascinating look at the life of Manhattan Project scientist Harold Urey.Smithsonian Curator Matthew Shindell discusses how the Manhattan Project shaped Urey on his path from farm boy to scientific celebrity.Historical Society lectures are free, but registration is required to receive a Zoom link. Lectures are limited to 100 participants, so sign up early to reserve a spot.To register, visit www.losalamoshistory.org/events and follow the links to the EventBrite page.This talk draws from Shindell’s new biography of Nobel Prize-winning chemist Urey (1893–1981), The Life and Science of Harold C. Urey.Urey was one of the most famous American scientists of the 20th century and participated in some of the century’s most significant moments, including the Manhattan Project and NASA’s lunar exploration program.Shindell shines new light on Urey’s achievements and efforts to shape his public and private lives. He follows Urey through his orthodox religious upbringing, the scientific work that won him the Nobel Prize, and his subsequent efforts to use his fame to intervene in political, social and scientific matters.By exploring those efforts, as well as Urey’s evolution from farm boy to scientific celebrity, listeners can discern broader changes in the social and intellectual landscape of twentieth century America.Shindell is curator of Planetary Science at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. He co-hosts the museum’s podcast, AirSpace. He holds a PhD in History of Science and Science Studies from the University of California, San Diego, an MS in Biology and Society from Arizona State University, and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop.Shindell has taught at Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, Georgetown University, the University of Southern California and UC San Diego.The lecture series will continue with a 6 p.m. presentation Nov. 17 when Alex Wellerstein will present “The ‘Best-Kept Secret of the War’? The Successes and Failures of Manhattan Project Secrecy.”The Los Alamos Historical Society lecture series is made possible by the generous sponsorship of Enterprise Bank & Trust, Member FDIC; the National Endowment for the Humanities; the New Mexico Humanities Council; and Robin and Richard McLean.The Los Alamos Historical Society preserves, promotes and communicates the remarkable history and inspiring stories of Los Alamos and its people for our community, for the global audience, and for future generations. More information about the Historical Society can be found at www.losalamoshistory.org.Stay up to date with the latest news from the Historical Society by following @LosAlamosHistory on Facebook and Instagram. Members make the work of the Historical Society possible. Become a member today at https://www.losalamoshistory.org/membership.html.last_img read more

YIFFY: celebrating young professionals

first_imgThis year’s award went to Evgeniya Khokhlova, who represents the Russian Association of Forwarding and Logistic Organizations and is a specialist in project logistics at SVH-Freight.Khokhlova beat three other regional finalists selected from entrants around the world. Her prize is two one-week training sessions with insurance and risk management service provider TT Club at one of its regional headquarters in London, New Jersey or Hong Kong.The other three finalists were: Enos Chapara, tracking and documentation agent at Bollore Transport and Logistics Zimbabwe, representing Shipping and Forwarding Agents’ Association of Zimbabwe; Rachel van Harmelen, business unit sales manager at DSV Panalpina in Canada, representing the Canadian International Freight Forwarders Association; and Phillip Burgess, South Island manager at Burnard International in New Zealand, representing Customs Brokers and Freight Forwarders Federation of New Zealand.The TT Club-sponsored 2020 YIFFY Award will be presented at next year’s FIATA Congress in Busan, South Korea on October 19-24.YIFFY candidates must submit a 6,000-word dissertation outlining the pertinent details of an import and export shipment from their native country. The four finalists will then present their dissertations in person to a panel of judges at the Congress, where the overall winner will be selected.www.ttclub.comfiata.comlast_img read more

Walter Presents: Ride Upon the Storm season 2 preview – rousing stuff that’s exquisitely acted

first_imgI recall reviewing season 1 of Ride Upon The Storm (Herrens Veje in its native Danish) back in January 2019 and remarking that this isn’t a crime show at all. At the time, it was unusual for Walter Presents to offer us anything that didn’t involve a gruesome murder or twenty; but these days, WP have widened their net to incorporate more and more drama of all types and genres; including family dramas like this.If you want to avoid spoilers for Ride Upon the Storm, stop reading now.For Season 2 of RUTS, there are still no murders – not yet, at least – but there is more family intrigue for Johannes Krogh (the masterful Lars Mikkelsen) and his dysfunctional clan.Credit: Tine Harden / Walter PresentsIt’s 18 months since the death of August (Johannes’ son), who walked in front of a lorry in the Danish countryside at the end of Season 1. Christian (Johannes’ other son), who was with August that fateful day, is immersing himself in his new self-help book, trying to cope with the guilt of being unable to prevent August’s death. Johannes is coping with troubles of his own, as August’s church is on the verge of being sold to the Muslim community, causing discord and anger from some parishioners in Brovang – a view Johannes is not unsympathetic with and one which the tabloids are quick to promote and exploit for a good storyline. As he admits to colleagues, that church is all that he has left of his son and he doesn’t want it sold to anyone – be it Aldi or Allah.Johannes’ wife, Elisabeth – played sublimely by Eleonora Jørgensen, winner of two best actress awards at the Danish Film Awards – is undergoing therapy as a result of the breakdown of her marriage to Johannes. They’re still living together, but they’re no longer intimate; and she struggles to cope with his moods and temper, whilst still mourning the loss of her son.Credit: Tine Harden / Walter PresentsElsewhere, Emilie – August’s widow – has decided that their young child will not be baptised in church, but instead has chosen to have a non-religious naming ceremony; something that further distances her from her father-in-law.This is rousing stuff. It’s exquisitely acted throughout, particularly by Jørgensen and Mikkelsen. In addition, the characterisation is so beautifully rounded, it’s an absolute joy to watch. Take Johannes as an example – he’s a violent, dinosaur of a man, and yet when his daughter-in-law stops him from seeing his grandson, you cannot help but feel sorry for the man. The scriptwriting is top-drawer; and everything from the musical score to the camerawork are faultless too. It is proof that you don’t need flash and crash to create quality drama.Walter Presents: Ride Upon the Storm launches on Channel 4 at 11pm on 5th April and the boxset is available via All4 immediately after the transmission of first episode.last_img read more